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Economy

Economy

Brazil's economic recession may end up affecting all other Latin American countries, especially its closest neighbors: Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. The negative effects of this situation will be mostly felt on trade but they will also impact tourism, foreign direct investment (FDI), and fund flows, among others. However, according to BBVA Research, the general effect of Brazil's negative circumstances is not strong enough to bring a crisis situation to other countries in the region.

We frequently hear arguments for and against the TTIP, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership that the US and the EU have been working on since 2013. The groups against this partnership focus on how it will only benefit large corporations at the expense of smaller businesses and citizens, while the groups that argue for it underscore the advantages it will bring in trade and export related matters for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). But, what do Spanish SMEs think about the TTIP?

Picture of copper prices at seven year low

For the metal, the year is off to a very bad start: Turbulences in the Chinese market during the first days of 2016 have driven copper prices down, which has traded under US$2 per pound in recent sessions.

 

Markets across the globe surged after Mario Draghi’s words. Yesterday, the Chairman of the European Central Bank (ECB) hinted at the possibility of stepping up the stimulus program as early as March, after holding the governing board meeting in Frankfurt. However, the ECB decided to hold back for the time being, making no significant announcements and meeting expectations.

Brazil, the biggest economy in Latin America, is facing a political and economic crisis that is keeping the country in recession and will extend over 2016. We talked about the economic situation and outlook for the country with Enestor Dos Santos, economist at BBVA Research for Brazil, who explained that if the situation is to be normalized it is important to resolve the political situation first. This will reduce uncertainty, generate more stability and enable the right decisions to be made to allow the country to grow again. However, he clarifies that recovery from this economic recession will start gradually in 2017 and gather strength after the 2018 elections.

BBVA Chairman and CEO Francisco González, shared his insights into some pressing issues following his participation at the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos. Mr. González addressed some of the hottest topics affecting the Spanish economic and political landscape, as well as the global financial industry, and stated that “Spain needs a stable and realistic government, one that continues to work on the reforms we need to underpin growth.”