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Economy

Economy

The longer you own your home, typically the more equity you build. Many people wait to tap into this equity, while others use it to strengthen their financial footing.

One of the ways a homeowner might put their home equity to work for them is with a home equity line of credit (HELOC). BBVA Compass Director of Mortgage and Home Equity Originations Jose Pascual shares his top three reasons that homeowners might want to consider a HELOC.

The Eurosystem is the monetary authority of the euro area. It comprises the European Central Bank (ECB) and the national central banks of the Member States whose currency is the euro. Its primary objective is the maintenance of price stability, and specifically, keeping inflation in the euro area (calculated based on internal stats of the ECB) “close to but under 2 per cent.”

BBVA Compass recently announced the launch of the digital BBVA Compass Express Personal Loan to customers and prospects across its footprint.* The timing of the announcement was auspicious given that it was released nearly one year after the date from when the bank booked its first ever end-to-end digital loan. Now, just over a year later, the bank has achieved a record for one-week consumer loan production, with online originations officially exceeding branch production in that same week.

Among the many perks of homeownership is the equity you build over time as your home appreciates and your total loan amount decreases. Equity is an asset that you can use in a variety of ways, including borrowing against it in the form of a Home Equity Line of Credit, or HELOC.

If you’re a homeowner and in the market for a loan, a HELOC may be the right option for you. To find out more, read on to understand what a HELOC is and how it works.

Bonds and loans are financing instruments used at one moment or other by companies during the course of their existence. These are two conceptually different credit products that are sometimes confused. It is important to differentiate between both means of financing and understand their characteristics in order to know their true essence.

Fears of a trade war between the U.S. and China are escalating by the day. Trump announced extra duties on 10% of Chinese imports and the two world powers have entered into a “tit-for-tat” trade retaliation that has unnerved investors and shaken financial markets. Nevertheless, the likelihood that these skirmishes will turn into a full-blown trade war are still low, as explained in a BBVA Research report.

Although the uncertainty surrounding Catalonia’s economic policy hasn’t had the expected negative impact, the favorable global environment seems to have offset the its negative effect on production and employment. Consequently, BBVA Research has upgraded its 2018 and 2019 GDP growth forecasts for Spain to 2.9% and 2.5% from 2.5% and 2.3% respectively. The report was presented today by Jorge Sicilia, Chief Economist of BBVA Group and Head of BBVA Research, Rafael Doménech, Head of Macroeconomic Analysis of BBVA Research and Miguel Cardoso, Chief Economist Spain and Portugal. Under this scenario, the country is expected to generate about 940,000 jobs over the two year period, causing the country’s unemployment rate to drop below 14%.

Europe and the U.S. need to promote global trade and services standards. And to do this, they must keep relying on multilateral agreements, which set out a strategic position with respect to third parties from a commercial, economic and political point of view. “The United States and Europe, united, are much stronger,” said José Manuel González-Páramo, Executive Member of the Board, Head of Global Economics, Regulation and Public Affairs at BBVA, in Barcelona on Monday.

Taking action against climate change and promoting sustainable development is not a fight to save the planet; it’s a fight for the human race. Olivier Guersent, Director-General at the European Commission asserted himself emphatically at the “Financing Sustainable Growth” conference held on March 22nd in Brussels with influential figures such as Emmanuel Macron, Michael Bloomberg, and Jean-Claude Juncker.