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Sustainability and Responsible Banking

Sustainability and Responsible Banking

Thanks to blockchain, ten-thousand Syrian refugees in Jordan were able to receive humanitarian help faster and more efficiently. The technology’s humanitarian applications will yield advantages that far exceed those of current protocols.

Euromoney has chosen BBVA as the best bank for transaction business and Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin America in the 2017 edition of its Awards for Excellence.  The prestigious international magazine has also recognized BBVA Bancomer as the best bank in Mexico.  In a ceremony held last night in London, Euromoney recognized the institution’s work in Latin America and Mexico, which have been key markets for the group for decades.

The agility, price and quality of digital services benefit customers, according to BBVA Executive Director José Manuel González-Páramo. At the Young Ibero-American Leaders Convention, organized by the Carolina Foundation in Madrid, he explained the benefits of the digital age for customers, especially in Latin America where a large portion of the population does not have access to financial services. “Customers are the main beneficiaries of the technological change we are experiencing. The opportunities enabled by digitization give more power to them,” he indicated.

At a debate about the opportunities offered by digitization, he noted that “the immense agility” with which customers can be reached, “the prices that are so low” compared to the past and “the quality of services” benefit customers.

How peoples’ behavior affects the economy and how their conduct can be educated so they can aspire to a better present and future wellbeing. That was the central idea of the panel Behavioral economics and financial education, moderated by Jorge Sicilia, director of BBVA Research. The participants included Josh Wright, executive director of Ideas 42; Carlos Ramírez, chairman of the National Commission for Retirement Savings of Mexico and Hugo Ñopo, senior researcher at the Group for the Analysis of Development (GRADE).