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Finance

Finance

green tree, healthcare, BBVA

BBVA has acted as Green Loan Coordinator of a €176 million green loan granted to Sociedade Concesionaria Novo Hospital de Vigo S.A., the concessionaire responsible for non-hospital services at the instititution, which has been renamed Hospital Álvaro Cunqueiro. Servizo Galego de Saúde, Galicia’s healthcare service, awarded the 25-year construction and operation to the concessionaire, a consortium formed by Acciona, Grupo Puentes, Veolia España and Concesia.

For months, European authorities have been mulling over a crucial issue for the health of the financial sector: reducing the stock of non-performing assets that have been piling up in banks’ balance sheets during the years of financial crisis.  The creation of a bad European bank is one of the alternatives that are being considered to solve the problem.

UK Challenger bank Atom is making its first move overseas by beginning to offer savers in Germany access to its products.

The app-based bank, which is part owned by BBVA, has partnered with Deposit Solutions in order to launch fixed-rate products to customers in the country.

One of the topics of debate in the European Union’s Payment Services Directive 2, better known as PSD2, is how to articulate the access to customer data by third parties. The European Banking Authority (EBA) has said it is in favor of access through Application Program Interfaces (APIs), which it regards as being more secure in protecting customer data. That position differs from the one taken to date by the European Commission.

This week marks yet another milestone for BBVA in green financing in Europe. SSE, the largest producer of renewable energy in the UK, chose BBVA to act as green structuring bank and joint bookrunner on its inaugural EUR 600 million green bond. This is the biggest-ever green bond issued by a UK company, and the financing will be destined to the refinancing of onshore wind farms in SSE’s energy generation portfolio.

Each time I pull out my debit card to make a purchase, I’m hit with a minor – but not inconsequential – question. A cashier or the point of sale machine at the counter where I’ve swiped or inserted my card asks that all-too-familiar inquiry: Debit or credit?

Typically, my default choice is debit, but not for any good or informed reason. I’m paying with a debit card, so the obvious choice is debit, right? But then, why am I given an option in the first place? Does it really matter which button I hit or what option I choose? To help answer these questions, I talked to BBVA Compass Director of Merchant Acquiring Adam Spencer.