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BBVA Uruguay

BBVA Uruguay

BBVA has celebrated its first ‘Values Day.’ A day to embrace and live the values of the Group: Customer comes first; We think big; We are one team. BBVA Executive chairman Francisco González and CEO Carlos Torres Vila reaffirmed these values as “the heart of a long process of transformation that the bank is spearheading at a global level.”

Big data and data science have become disciplines increasingly in demand in the labor market, serving as tools of great value in training the youngest professionals. With the technological future for the region looking promising, students in Latin America are increasingly engaged in training in these areas and finding out how to apply them to real life.

BBVA continued leading the way to innovation in Latin America during 2017, becoming the region’s digital bank par excellence. That distinction was confirmed by Global Finance magazine, which judged BBVA’s mobile banking app to be the best in Latin America. BBVA’s local franchises in the region have set the pace in the development of products and services which, just as in the case of mobile banking, aim to make their customers’ lives easier and deliver on the Group’s intent to bring the age of opportunity to everyone.

The rules of the game are changing more and more quickly. Some authors refer to this period of change as the Fourth Industrial Revolution (Klaus Schwab, Debate 2016) with “growing harmonization and integration of many different disciplines and discoveries” that affect both the physical world (autonomous vehicles, 3D printing, robotics, etc.) and the digital world (Internet of Things, blockchain, etc.).

After the positive surprise of growth in Q3 2016 (+2% y-o-y) and the developments that took place in the final months of the year, we expect GDP for 2016, which will be disclosed in May, to close at about 1.2%, finally pulling out of the stagnation of recent years, and leaving a positive momentum for 2017.

picture of productivity work labor market uruguay office resource bbva

After a years of steep deterioration, Uruguay has managed to partially recover some of the ground lost after a historic fall in productivity.  Despite this, a person working in Uruguay today reaches an average productivity slightly above 40% of the level they would achieve working in an advanced economy.  How is this possible?  What can be done?  This paper sets out a potential explanation and suggests a line of action for further progress.

Since the acquisition of Credit Uruguay in 2011, BBVA has established itself as the second private financial institution in the country. In this position, our goal is to help our customers make better financial decisions, offering unique products and services for everyone. An effort our customers have recognized, making us the top bank in Uruguay in the net promoter score.

Creating Opportunities is the BBVA Group’s new tagline. After a decade, ‘Adelante’ is giving way to a new tagline that fits with the bank’s new purpose: To bring the age of opportunity to everyone. In this interview, Carlos Ricardo, the BBVA Group’s Marketing Director and Brand Director Carlos Pérez Beruete explain the process that led to the new tagline. It will also be accompanied by a new image, identity, sound and value proposition. “2017 will be the year that consumers clearly see how the bank has been transforming in recent years,” they say.

Picture of La Vela, BBVA´s new architectural Madrid building BBVA

BBVA has a new tagline: Creating Opportunities. The bank will start using it in February and it will be progressively introduced in all countries, all communications to customers and all of BBVA’s printed and digital materials. BBVA’s new tagline sums up the bank’s purpose, launched a few months ago: “To bring the age of opportunity to everyone”

The day after Thanksgiving, or the last Friday of November, is celebrated nearly all over the world as Black Friday, the day that marks the first day of Christmas shopping. Over the years, with the arrival of new technologies, sales have been extended to Monday, known as Cyber Monday when discounts are offered for online shoppers.

Picture of BBVA Research report growth Latin America economy 2016 and 2017

Slow recovery of commodity prices and weak economic activity have affected tax revenue. This has lead to adjustments in government spending in many Latin American economies. Therefore, despite some recovery in commodity prices over recent months, BBVA Research has lowered its growth outlook for the region to an expected contraction of -1.1% in 2016. In its Latin America Economic Outlook report on the second quarter, BBVA Research affirms that it does expect to see 1.7% growth in 2017.

Central banks in Latin America are finding it particularly difficult to meet their target of low and stable inflation, since many countries are facing at the same time problems of high inflation (fueled by the depreciation of the exchange rate) and low economic growth.

Brazil’s economic recession may end up affecting all other Latin American countries, especially its closest neighbors: Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. The negative effects of this situation will be mostly felt on trade but they will also impact tourism, foreign direct investment (FDI), and fund flows, among others. However, according to BBVA Research, the general effect of Brazil’s negative circumstances is not strong enough to bring a crisis situation to other countries in the region.

Picture of challenges for 2016 in Latin America BBVA

Economic recovery, balancing national budgets and controlling inflation are just some of the challenges facing Latin American countries in the coming year. After a less than dynamic 2015, it is hoped that 2016 will see a return to economic growth, though this is one objective which will not be easy to achieve.

El Niño is the warm phase of the ENSO (“El Niño Southern Oscillation”), a meteorological event defined by prolonged warming in the Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures. This year’s event is currently affecting the countries of the Latin American Pacific basin, and could be the worst since 1950, due to the impact of the climate change.