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Life and Culture

Life and Culture

A signature sound is much more than a song. It should tell a story that identifies it with the company’s values. That’s 'How We Dream' for BBVA – the sound track of opportunities - and Maico, the group that is the voice and soul of these opportunities.

Franco’s government pushed relentlessly to normalize the financial system after determining that most of the efforts over the last decade to open up the sector had been effective. Progressive liberalization of the system was therefore considered a path to continue following. Among other issues, the administration focused on a change in private banking in 1972.

Blockchain Revolution

Blockchain has the potential to transform the way business is conducted, whether in transactions between private individuals or relations between government agencies and citizens. With this column about e-commerce, Adolfo Contreras Ruiz de Alda, co-author of Blockchain: the Industrial Revolution of Internet, begins a series of articles that will describe the impact of the new decentralized technologies on different areas and activities.

Music, an indispensable connecting thread for telling stories. Excitement, a fundamental element when starting a new project. The responsibility for producing a job well done. These are the three pieces of a new puzzle that BBVA is putting together. Do you want to know more?

BBVA’s expansion to the U.S. came after it found success in South America and Mexico. The U.S. was an attractive market from a demographics standpoint, with a growing population, a solid economy - which also happened to be the world’s largest - and a positive banking environment. Also, given the Group’s leadership in Latin America, the U.S. with its large and growing Hispanic population was a natural choice.

In a report entitled The Future of Football, Futurizon predicts that in the future, sports events will be broadcast using tiny drones capable of hovering a few inches above the playing field, swirling around spectators or chasing the ball in the air. Except for referees, players and coaches, ordinary spectators have always enjoyed these events from architectural points of view:  the stands or the sides of the pitch. And, even if we don’t realize it yet, narratives have also depended on these points of view. What would happen if the perspective changed? Would it be possible to televise a match exactly as the referee sees it? Would that be of any interest at all? Or telling what an embedded drone observes?